Travel and Tourism



Mizzima - 1 December 2014
Myanmar has seen a five-fold increase in tourism income over the last decade with the sector pulling in US$905 million in 2014, according to a report on the progress in the Myanmar hotels and tourism sector released on November 30.

The country brought in US$171 million in 2004 in comparison with US$905 million in 2014.

   


The upswing began in 2011 under the new government of President U Thein Sein as the country opened up when the number of visitors began to increase substantially and the tourism sector brought in US$300 million for the year.Back in 2004, the country hosted 500,000 foreign visitors. The arrivals figure for 2014 may reach 3 million by the end of the year, with around 2.4 million clocked from January to October so far.

At the same time, the number of new hotels and guesthouses is on the increase. Back in 2004, Myanmar had 787 hotels with 28,000 rooms. By 2014, the number of hotels stands at 1,076 with 42,000 rooms.

Myanmar’s tourism strategy envisages 5 million arrivals in 2015.

Ten of the most beautiful places to visit in Myanmar
Global Grasshopper - 14 July 2014

      

Travel: Retracing George Orwell's steps
New York Times blog  - 15 November 2013
In Myanmar, a long-isolated nation now opening up to the world after decades of military rule, one still finds romantic echoes of the former British colony that inspired the young author to pen his first novel, ‘Burmese Days.’ 

Lawrence Osborne visits the cities of Yangon, Bagan and Mandalay to look for what’s left of the landscape and British architecture that inspired the young Orwell to pen his novels. 


Myanmar: Opening to Tourism, Investment - and Reform?
National Geographic Daily News - 17 August 2013
Picture it: pagodas, palaces, parks - a paradise for photographers. Keep clicking. Through your lens you see the "new" and "mysterious," the "mystical" and "magical" Myanmar, also known as Burma. There is so much for tourists to see: Buddhist temples, royal gardens, tranquil rivers, and paddies. (See related photo gallery: "Land of Shadows.")

But wait, wasn't this Myanmar once a xenophobic, tightly controlled, reclusive, repressive country? How can the same place that limited visas and travel for decades now be attracting planeloads of tourists - and branding itself for its "hospitality" and welcoming atmosphere?

Yes, the same country that until 2010 kept its leading dissident, Aung San Suu Kyi, under house arrest, markets itself today as the "Golden Land" of mystical charms and exotic attractions. Sounds almost schizophrenic. But Myanmar may be the best example of a once-closed land that has now discovered the upsides (and possible downsides) of openness, public diplomacy, and tourism.


Myanmar unveils US$0.5 billion tourism plan
Asian Development Bank - 5 June 2013
The Government of Myanmar, alongside the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Government of Norway, today unveiled a Tourism Master Plan which outlines 38 development projects valued at nearly a half billion dollars that will help increase Myanmar’s tourism competitiveness, protect environmentally important areas, and safeguard ethnic communities.

“This master plan outlines a path to welcoming more visitors to Myanmar without threatening our unique cultural heritage or endangering pristine environments,” said U Htay Aung, Myanmar’s Minister for Hotels and Tourism.

If Myanmar continues implementing economic, political, and social reforms, international visitor arrivals are forecast to rise as high as 7.5 million in 2020 – a seven-fold increase from current numbers – with corresponding tourism receipts worth $10.1 billion. Under a high growth scenario, the tourism industry could provide up to 1.4 million jobs by 2020. Continue reading.....

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